Dangerous Sea Creatures You Could Find In Rock Pool

Rockpooling is fun and generally considered relatively safe. But there are some dangers from sea creatures that you still need to avoid.. Let’s say, gloves and shoes can give you good protection.

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Jellyfish

The most dangerous marine life on our list is jellyfish.

Jellyfish are very beautiful, but the jellyfish in the ocean are basically poisonous, and the larger the size, the stronger the toxicity.

The most poisonous one known so far is the box jellyfish.  it has about 60 15-foot-long tentacles, each with enough toxin to kill 50 people. These creatures are transparent and light blue, which makes them almost invisible. It has caused more deaths in Australia than snakes, sharks and saltwater crocodiles combined. The venom acts very fast, and when it comes into contact with the human body, it can stop the human’s heart and lung function within 3 minutes. (The fastest is only 30 seconds). Fortunately, they mainly live in Australia, the Philippines, and other tropical waters, not in the UK.

But Physalia physalis, another simular creature was found on the beaches in Cornwall and Isles of Scilly.  Even a dead Physalia physalis can still cause the same damage within a few hours. The Physalia physalis can cause severe pain and leave a red weal mark. It takes 2-3 days to dissipate, and it can be fatal in severe cases.

Sea Urchin

Sea urchin is an ancient creature in the ocean, and there are many species. Here are five types of sea urchins which is poisonous.

Flower Urchin

Flower Urchin

Flower Urchin is very toxic, and the pain is unbearable after being stabbed, and it can lead to death.

Hatpin Urchin

Hatpin Urchin

Hatpin Urchin’s large spine has barbs at the end, which are toxic. When people encounter it, they are stabbed and the spine breaks in the skin. The pain is severe and the wound is red and swollen.

Long-spined urchin

Long-spined urchin

The spines of Long-spined urchin are particularly sharp, which breaks in the human body after piercing the skin, causing severe pain.

White Sea urchin

White Sea urchin

The toxin of the sea urchin can dissolve the red blood cells of humans, cattle, sheep, rabbits and fish.

Seaurchin 

Seaurchin 

Seaurchin is small, with an adult shell diameter of only about 4 cm. The spines are short and poisonous, but the eggs are good to eat.

Weever fish

weever fish

The spines of the weever fish can pierce your skin, which is how their venom is discharged.

These little fish are quite common in British waters, and although their stings can be painful, they’re not so dangerous.  They spend most of their time lying in the sand and therefore the majority of stings come from people merely standing on them while they are not wearing shoes.  Treatment of the sting is fairly simple,  put your wound in hot water, as hot as you can bear. It will reduce the effectiveness of the venom and helps to reduce spasms.

Oysters and Razor Fish

Oysters are generally attached to rocks, sometimes just on the beach. And their shells are very sharper, which can be easily scratched if you are not careful enough. Therefore, you should wear shoes when walking on the rocks. If you want to collect oysters, remember to wear gloves. 

You may not think these razor fish pose any harm, but they aren’t called razor fish for nothing. The curved edge of the shell is razor sharp and can easily leave you with a nasty cut if you happen to step on one.

Stingray

Stingray

The common stingray is found throughout Europe, but only along the southern and western coasts of the British Isles. 

Their long, thin, whip-like tail contains barbed spines which contain venom, which a stingray will use to sting. While stingrays are generally gentle creatures, they will sting if disturbed or stepped on.

Seal

Seal

While amazing to look at from afar, you shouldn’t get too close to any seals you encounter on your beach trip. Male seals can be very territorial and female seals will protect their young if they feel threatened.

Mussel

Mussel

You may think that there’s no harm in collecting mussels from the beach for your dinner, but be aware that mussels are filter feeders, which means it’s possible that they can absorb toxins and other nasty chemicals.

So, query local residential if you want to collect mussels, and usually they will give you warm advice.

Puffer fish

Puffer fish

The puffer fish is cute, but very poisonous. It hides in the dark under the rocks on the seashore. The venomous spines on both sides of the fish’s back and tails. Once stabbed by this sting, it will cause great pain and unbearable pain, and in serious cases, it will endanger life. So when you explore rock pool, especially under large rocks, don’t touch it with your bear hands.

Nassariidae 

Type of Nassariidae 

Nassariidae often be seen on the beach. It looks very similar to other edible conch. The appearance is really very beautiful, some are pure white, some are yellow and white, some are purple and brown, and the tail is It is sharp, slender, with nine layers of threads. But don’t be confused by its appearance at the seaside. This cone snail is poisonous and contains similar venomous as puffer fish . You can collect the shell, but DON’T EAT IT.

Poison hemlock

Poison hemlock

While not an animal, this is the most poisonous plant in the UK and is always found growing close to water – ingestion can lead to death, and even touching it can bring horrible consequences.

Its recognizable by its white clusters of small flowers and purple blotches on the stem. 
It’s found in damp areas in woodland, beside ditches and on the sides of roads, also been found somewhere near beaches.
You only need to eat a tiny amount of poison hemlock to have serious consequences as it causes respiratory paralysis and death.

I may have another post talking about poisonous plants later, now be ware stay way from the danger while enjoy rockpooling.